Tajik

Tajik, Tajik Persian, or Tajiki, (sometimes written Tadjik or Tadzhik; тоҷикӣ, تاجیکی‎, tojikī [tɔːdʒɪˈkiː]) is a variety of modern Persian spoken in Central Asia. Historically Tajiks called their language zabani farsī (Persian:زبان فارسی‎), meaning "Persian language"; the term zabani tajikī, or "Tajik language", was introduced in the 20th century by the Soviets. Most speakers of Tajik live in Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. Tajik is the official language of Tajikistan. In Afghanistan, where Tajiks make up a large part of the population, the dialect is less influenced by Turkic languages and is called Dari.

The dialect has diverged from Persian as spoken in Afghanistan and Iran, as a result of political borders, geographical isolation, the standardization process, and the influence of Russian and neighbouring Turkic languages. The standard language is based on the north-western dialects of Tajik (region of old major city of Samarkand), which has been somewhat influenced by the neighbouring Uzbek language as a result of geographical proximity. Tajik also retains numerous archaic elements in its vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammar that have been lost elsewhere in the Perso- phone world, in part due to its relative isolation in the mountains of Central Asia.

Contrary to its Dari and Farsi sisters, Tajik is written in the Cyrillic Alphabets. For further reading about this language please go the Persian or Dari page on our website.